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Japan Institute of Jungian Psychology
                                   
AJAJ title image
Association of Jungian Analysts, Japan
Japan Institute of Jungian Psychology


AJAJ has own training institute (Japan Institute of Jungian Psychology: JIJP) and has provided original training programs to the candidates, matriculated auditors, and registered members since 2002. Although these programs are generally opened only to students in Japan, AJAJ has been opening some of them held in English to our colleagues and the students of Analytical Psychology in neighboring countries since the Winter Semester 2013.

 2015 Summer Semester
 Seminar
No Speaker Date Time Place Fee
102   Joe Cambray May. 24th, 2015 (Sun)
  10:00~17:00
  (one-hour-lunch-time in between)
  Kyoto
  (Kyoto Terrsa)
¥ 10,800
Title and the outline
Ecology, Archetypes and Synchronicity

Reconsidering C. G. Jung’s conception of the psychoid archetypes offers a profoundly interconnected vision of reality. This can be envisioned as network model of the transpersonal psyche, which in its totality is the collective unconscious. We will look comparatively at recent ideas from ecology which explores interconnections among organisms as well as with their environments. In the first part of this seminar we will consider overlaps between these models of reality and how dialogue between them might be mutually enrich. Contrasts will also emerge, as in the comparison of the ecological self with the symbolic self.
In the second half of the seminar we will look at the more radical implications of interconnectedness. In analytical psychology this is discussed in terms of synchronicity. In ecology similar phenomena have been detected through detailed analysis of indirect, or circuitous pathways, revealing hidden links that could not be obtained from first order reflections. Again, we will compare and contrast these models of reality. In addition, if time permits we will touch briefly on the tenets of Hua Yen, or Kegon Buddhism that share features with these ideas and may provide a natural bridge between them.
Joe Cambray, Ph.D. is Past-President of the International Association for Analytical Psychology; he is on the Editorial Boards of several journals; the Journal of Analytical Psychology, The Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche, and Israel Annual of Psychoanalytic Theory, Research and Practice. He is also a faculty member at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. Dr. Cambray is a Jungian analyst in Boston and Providence, RI. His numerous publications include the book based on his Fay Lectures: Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe and a volume edited with Linda Carter, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Psychology. Some of his most recent papers include: “Cosmos and Culture in the Play of Synchronicity,” Spring Journal, Jungian Odyssey Series, 4, 133-147, 2012; “Jung, science, and his legacy,” in International Journal of Jungian Studies, 3:2, 110-124, 2011; and “Moments of complexity and enigmatic action: a Jungian view of the therapeutic field,” in Journal of Analytical Psychology, 56 (2) 296-309, 2011

 2014 Winter Semester
 Seminar
No Speaker Date Time Place Fee
154   Angela Connolly Feb. 1st, 2015 (Sun)
  10:00~17:00
  (one-hour-lunch-time in between)
  Kyoto
  (Kyoto Terrsa)
¥ 10,800
Title and the outline
Bridging the Reductive and the Synthetic: Some Clinical Implications of Synchronicity

With the introduction of the concepts of synchronicity and the psychoid unconscious, as Roderick Main notes, Jung ‘expanded analytical psychological theory into territory that even many of his followers would prefer not to enter.’ (2004,p,176) This consideration has been even more true of Freudian psychoanalysis where anomalous phenomena such as telepathy have long been a taboo subject despite the early interest shown by Freud and his first followers. Today however as Joe Cambray writes, ‘more reports of “anomalous phenomena” are being published’(2009,p.109) , thus opening the way for a more fruitful exchange between different schools of psychoanalytical thought on the clinical implications of such phenomena.
In the present paper I propose to look at some of the ambiguities and contradictions of Jung’s thinking on this subject in an attempt to clarify how we define what constitutes synchronistic events, the relationship between synchronicities and parapsychological events and their clinical significance. At the present moment, we are still unsure if such events should be considered as normal and useful ways of facilitating individuation or rather as signs of some underlying psychopathology in the patient or in the analyst, just as we are uncertain about the particular characteristics of the intersubjective field that can facilitate the production of synchronicities. Making use of the typology of mind-matter correlations presented by Atmanspacher and Fach and the distinction they draw between acategorial and non-categorial states of mind and their relationship to extraordinary experiences, I will make use of two clinical vignettes to illustrate the different states of mind in analyst and analysand that can lead to synchronicities.
Angela M Connolly (Italy), is a psychiatrist and Jungian analyst in private practice in Rome. She is a member of CIPA with training and supervisory functions, a member of the training commission and a faculty member. She lived and worked in Russia from 1996 to 2001 and since then, she has continued to teach, lecture and supervise internationally in China, in Taiwan and in Kazakhstan as well as in Eastern and Central Europe. She was deputy editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology for five years and is currently on the advisory board. She was the Honorary Secretary of the IAAP from 2010 to 2013 and at present is the Vice-President. She has published widely in English and Italian and has had articles translated in Russian and German. Her most recent works include ‘ Cognitive aesthetics of alchemical imagery’ published in 2013 in the Journal of Analytical Psychology, ‘ The cognitive aesthetics of dream metaphors’ published in ‘Understanding Jung’ edited by Angiola Iapoce published in Italy and ‘Out of the body: embodiment and its vicissitudes’ published again in the Journal of Analytical Psychology in 2013.

No Speaker Date Time Place Fee
255   Joe Cambray Mar. 22nd, 2015 (Sun)
  10:00~17:00
  (one-hour-lunch-time in between)
  Tokyo
  (Rengo Kaikan)
¥ 10,800
Title and the outline
The Relevance of Neuroscientific Evidence for Jungian Psychology

Early in his career C. G. Jung engaged in research employing psychophysical measurements that formed some of the first scientific evidence for the existence and role of the unconscious in psychological life. Coupled with a hermeneutic approach to understanding the content of the associations given during these measurements, Jung developed his theory of the human psyche composed of complexes. During the years prior to World War I, Jung's orientation towards science and psychology underwent a radical transformation as a part of the experiences which led to The Red Book. A new vision of science slowly began to form and was crystallized by the synchronistic events which brought The Red Book to a close. Subjective and objective elements of experience were felt by Jung to be inextricably bound, ultimately finding expression in the notion of the psychoid archetype. This view of the mind in nature has remained largely speculative from a scientific perspective. In this seminar we will look at some recent findings from neuroscientific research and related theorizing about the construction of the self with the emergence of mind that will allow some critical assessment of Jung's two approaches to science. In addition, we will also consider the limits of a neuroscientific approach to any such assessment.
Joe Cambray, Ph.D. is Past-President of the International Association for Analytical Psychology; he is on the Editorial Boards of several journals; the Journal of Analytical Psychology, The Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche, and Israel Annual of Psychoanalytic Theory, Research and Practice. He is also a faculty member at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. Dr. Cambray is a Jungian analyst in Boston and Providence, RI. His numerous publications include the book based on his Fay Lectures: Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe and a volume edited with Linda Carter, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Psychology. Some of his most recent papers include: “Cosmos and Culture in the Play of Synchronicity,” Spring Journal, Jungian Odyssey Series, 4, 133-147, 2012; “Jung, science, and his legacy,” in International Journal of Jungian Studies, 3:2, 110-124, 2011; and “Moments of complexity and enigmatic action: a Jungian view of the therapeutic field,” in Journal of Analytical Psychology, 56 (2) 296-309, 2011

 Supervision Group (GSV)
No Speaker Date Time Place Fee
721   Joe Cambray Mar. 21st, 2015(Sat)   10:00~17:00
  (one-hour-lunch-time in between)
    Tokyo
  (Rengo Kaikan)
¥ 32,400
Maximum 4 persons can present their cases for each group, and the presentation time for one person is 1.5 hours including discussion.
If more than 5 persons shall apply for a group, our students have precedence to present their cases, and an applicant who is not our candidate might be asked to attend as an observer. (Here we inform you that we have space for two more persons to present their cases for each group.)
The participation fee for an observer is half-price, \16,200-.
If ever the number of applicant was too many, we accept applications on a first-come basis.

 2013 Winter Semester
 Seminar
No Speaker Date Time Place Fee
152   Joe Cambray Nov. 24th, 2013 (Sun)   10:00~17:00
  (one-hour-lunch-time in between)
  Kyoto Terrsa
  (Kyoto Kujo)
¥ 10,500
Title and the outline
Self-organization and Emergence in Analytical Psychology

The contemporary study of complex adaptive systems affords a unique opportunity to reassess several of C. G. Jung’s key concepts, including the archetype, individuation, and synchronicity, in line with his own evolving model of the psyche. For example, as an integral part of bringing the Red Book to a close, Jung formulated the concept of synchronicity. After reviewing these events as well as Jung’s arguments for introducing a new cosmological principle (synchronicity), we will reconsider his formulations in the light of the new scientific paradigm of complexity theory. In this workshop we will extend these developments and apply the results to experiences of the interactive field in analysis. Observations of self-organizing processes in analysis leading to experiences of emergence (of an analytic third) reveal that what is encountered goes beyond the sum of the individual contributions of the partners. In this vein, clinical presentation of the use of empathy, enactments, parallel processes and moments of complexity including synchronistic occurrences within the context of analysis will be drawn upon.
Joe Cambray, Ph.D. is Past-President of the International Association for Analytical Psychology; he is on the Editorial Boards of several journals; the Journal of Analytical Psychology, The Jung Journal: Culture and Psyche, and Israel Annual of Psychoanalytic Theory, Research and Practice. He is also a faculty member at Harvard Medical School in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies. Dr. Cambray is a Jungian analyst in Boston and Providence, RI. His numerous publications include the book based on his Fay Lectures: Synchronicity: Nature and Psyche in an Interconnected Universe and a volume edited with Linda Carter, Analytical Psychology: Contemporary Perspectives in Jungian Psychology. Some of his most recent papers include: “Cosmos and Culture in the Play of Synchronicity,” Spring Journal, Jungian Odyssey Series, 4, 133-147, 2012; “Jung, science, and his legacy,” in International Journal of Jungian Studies, 3:2, 110-124, 2011; and “Moments of complexity and enigmatic action: a Jungian view of the therapeutic field,” in Journal of Analytical Psychology, 56 (2) 296-309, 2011

 Supervision Group (GSV)
No Speaker Date Time Place Fee
721   Joanne
  Wieland-Burston
Nov. 17th,
2013 (Sun)
  10:00~17:00
  (one-hour-lunch-time in between)
  AJAJ Office
  (Kyoto Shijo-Karasuma)
  
¥ 31,500
722   Joe Cambray Nov. 23ed,
2013 (Sat)
¥ 31,500
Maximum 4 persons can present their cases for each group, and the presentation time for one person is 1.5 hours including discussion.
If more than 5 persons shall apply for a group, our students have precedence to present their cases, and an applicant who is not our candidate might be asked to attend as an observer. (Here we inform you that we have space for two more persons to present their cases for each group.)
The participation fee for an observer is half-price, ¥ 15,750-.
If ever the number of applicant was too many, we accept applications on a first-come basis.
Dr. Joanne Wieland-Burston is an appointed training analyst of the Jung Institute in 1991. She regularly leads case colloquia, especially focussing on "the manifestation of the unconscious in images, the body and play". Play refers to the technique which she has developed called "Psychodrama with Objects". Her first publication in psychology was an article in Free Associations Press (London) on somatic countertransference: ?When the Doodling Stops“ (1986). In 1988 she moved to Munich where she became interested in the after-effects of the Nazi period on people in psychotherapy today; in 1999 she founded a supervision group on that subject (which she has since extended to included other collective trauma) and has spoken widely on the topic since.
She has written two books: Chaos and Order in the World of the Psyche (Routledge) and Contemporary Solitude (Nicolas Hayes), which have been translated into many languages and many articles on various topics. I have also lectured in many countries, including Japan (Jung-Institute, Kyoto - 2003).